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Advanced: configuration

Configuration object

Configuration file exports a single TestConfig object. See TestConfig properties for available configuration options.

Note that each test project can provide its own options, for example two projects can run different tests by providing different testDirs.

Here is an example that defines a common timeout and two projects. The "Smoke" project runs a small subset of tests without retries, and "Default" project runs all other tests with retries.

// playwright.config.ts
import type { PlaywrightTestConfig } from '@playwright/test';
const config: PlaywrightTestConfig = {
timeout: 60000, // Timeout is shared between all tests.
projects: [
{
name: 'Smoke',
testMatch: /.*smoke.spec.ts/,
retries: 0,
},
{
name: 'Default',
testIgnore: /.*smoke.spec.ts/,
retries: 2,
},
],
};
export default config;

TestInfo object

Test functions, fixtures and hooks receive a TestInfo parameter that provides information about the currently running test as well as some useful utilities that include:

  • Information about the test, for example title, config and project.
  • Information about test execution, for example expectedStatus and status.
  • Test artifact utilities, for example outputPath() and attach().

See TestInfo methods and properties for all available information and utilities.

Here is an example test that saves information to a file using TestInfo.

// example.spec.ts
import { test } from '@playwright/test';

test('my test needs a file', async ({ table }, testInfo) => {
// Do something with the table...
// ... and then save contents.
const filePath = testInfo.outputPath('table.dat');
await table.saveTo(filePath);
});

Here is an example fixture that automatically saves debug logs when the test fails.

// my-test.ts
import * as debug from 'debug';
import * as fs from 'fs';
import { test as base } from '@playwright/test';

// Note how we mark the fixture as { auto: true }.
// This way it is always instantiated, even if the test does not use it explicitly.
export const test = base.extend<{ saveLogs: void }>({
saveLogs: [ async ({}, use, testInfo) => {
const logs = [];
debug.log = (...args) => logs.push(args.map(String).join(''));
debug.enable('mycomponent');

await use();

if (testInfo.status !== testInfo.expectedStatus)
fs.writeFileSync(testInfo.outputPath('logs.txt'), logs.join('\n'), 'utf8');
}, { auto: true } ]
});

Launching a development web server during the tests

To launch a server during the tests, use the webServer option in the configuration file.

If port is specified in the config, test runner will wait for 127.0.0.1:port or ::1:port to be available before running the tests. If url is specified in the config, test runner will wait for that url to return a 2xx, 3xx, 400, 401, 402, or 403 response before running the tests.

For continuous integration, you may want to use the reuseExistingServer: !process.env.CI option which does not use an existing server on the CI. To see the stdout, you can set the DEBUG=pw:webserver environment variable.

The port (but not the url) gets passed over to Playwright as a testOptions.baseURL. For example port 8080 produces baseURL equal http://localhost:8080.

note

It is also recommended to specify testOptions.baseURL in the config, so that tests could use relative urls.

// playwright.config.ts
import type { PlaywrightTestConfig } from '@playwright/test';
const config: PlaywrightTestConfig = {
webServer: {
command: 'npm run start',
url: 'http://localhost:3000/app/',
timeout: 120 * 1000,
reuseExistingServer: !process.env.CI,
},
use: {
baseURL: 'http://localhost:3000/app/',
},
};
export default config;

Now you can use a relative path when navigating the page:

// test.spec.ts
import { test } from '@playwright/test';
test('test', async ({ page }) => {
// baseURL is set in the config to http://localhost:3000/app/
// This will navigate to http://localhost:3000/app/login
await page.goto('./login');
});

Multiple web servers (or background processes) can be launched simultaneously by providing an array of webServer configurations. See testConfig.webServer for additional examples and documentation.

Global setup and teardown

To set something up once before running all tests, use globalSetup option in the configuration file. Global setup file must export a single function that takes a config object. This function will be run once before all the tests.

Similarly, use globalTeardown to run something once after all the tests. Alternatively, let globalSetup return a function that will be used as a global teardown. You can pass data such as port number, authentication tokens, etc. from your global setup to your tests using environment variables.

Here is a global setup example that authenticates once and reuses authentication state in tests. It uses baseURL and storageState options from the configuration file.

// global-setup.ts
import { chromium, FullConfig } from '@playwright/test';

async function globalSetup(config: FullConfig) {
const { baseURL, storageState } = config.projects[0].use;
const browser = await chromium.launch();
const page = await browser.newPage();
await page.goto(baseURL!);
await page.locator('input[name="user"]').fill('user');
await page.locator('input[name="password"]').fill('password');
await page.locator('text=Sign in').click();
await page.context().storageState({ path: storageState as string });
await browser.close();
}

export default globalSetup;

Specify globalSetup, baseURL and storageState in the configuration file.

// playwright.config.ts
import type { PlaywrightTestConfig } from '@playwright/test';

const config: PlaywrightTestConfig = {
globalSetup: require.resolve('./global-setup'),
use: {
baseURL: 'http://localhost:3000/',
storageState: 'state.json',
},
};
export default config;

Tests start already authenticated because we specify storageState that was populated by global setup.

import { test } from '@playwright/test';

test('test', async ({ page }) => {
await page.goto('/');
// You are signed in!
});

You can make arbitrary data available in your tests from your global setup file by setting them as environment variables via process.env.

// global-setup.ts
import { FullConfig } from '@playwright/test';

async function globalSetup(config: FullConfig) {
process.env.FOO = 'some data';
// Or a more complicated data structure as JSON:
process.env.BAR = JSON.stringify({ some: 'data' });
}

export default globalSetup;

Tests have access to the process.env properties set in the global setup.

import { test } from '@playwright/test';

test('test', async ({ page }) => {
// environment variables which are set in globalSetup are only available inside test().
const { FOO, BAR } = process.env;

// FOO and BAR properties are populated.
expect(FOO).toEqual('some data');

const complexData = JSON.parse(BAR);
expect(BAR).toEqual({ some: 'data' });
});

Capturing trace of failures during global setup

In some instances, it may be useful to capture a trace of failures encountered during the global setup. In order to do this, you must start tracing in your setup, and you must ensure that you stop tracing if an error occurs before that error is thrown. This can be achieved by wrapping your setup in a try...catch block. Here is an example that expands the global setup example to capture a trace.

// global-setup.ts
import { chromium, FullConfig } from '@playwright/test';

async function globalSetup(config: FullConfig) {
const { baseURL, storageState } = config.projects[0].use;
const browser = await chromium.launch();
const context = await browser.newContext();
const page = await context.newPage();
try {
await context.tracing.start({ screenshots: true, snapshots: true });
await page.goto(baseURL!);
await page.locator('input[name="user"]').fill('user');
await page.locator('input[name="password"]').fill('password');
await page.locator('text=Sign in').click();
await context.storageState({ path: storageState as string });
await context.tracing.stop({
path: './test-results/setup-trace.zip',
})
await page.close();
} catch (error) {
await context.tracing.stop({
path: './test-results/failed-setup-trace.zip',
});
await page.close();
throw error;
}
}

export default globalSetup;

Projects

Playwright Test supports running multiple test projects at the same time. This is useful for running the same or different tests in multiple configurations.

Same tests, different configuration

Here is an example that runs the same tests in different browsers:

// playwright.config.ts
import { type PlaywrightTestConfig, devices } from '@playwright/test';

const config: PlaywrightTestConfig = {
projects: [
{
name: 'chromium',
use: { ...devices['Desktop Chrome'] },
},
{
name: 'firefox',
use: { ...devices['Desktop Firefox'] },
},
{
name: 'webkit',
use: { ...devices['Desktop Safari'] },
},
],
};
export default config;

You can run all projects or just a single one:

# Run both projects - each test will be run three times
npx playwright test

# Run a single project - each test will be run once
npx playwright test --project=chromium

Different tests, different configuration

Each project can be configured separately, and run different set of tests with different options. You can use testProject.testDir, testProject.testMatch and testProject.testIgnore to configure which tests should the project run.

Here is an example that runs projects with different tests and configurations. The "Smoke" project runs a small subset of tests without retries, and "Default" project runs all other tests with retries.

// playwright.config.ts
import type { PlaywrightTestConfig } from '@playwright/test';
const config: PlaywrightTestConfig = {
timeout: 60000, // Timeout is shared between all tests.
projects: [
{
name: 'Smoke',
testMatch: /.*smoke.spec.ts/,
retries: 0,
},
{
name: 'Default',
testIgnore: /.*smoke.spec.ts/,
retries: 2,
},
],
};
export default config;

You can run all projects or just a single one:

# Run both projects
npx playwright test

# Run a single project
npx playwright test --project=Smoke

Custom project parameters

Projects can be also used to parametrize tests with your custom configuration - take a look at this separate guide.

WorkerInfo object

Depending on the configuration and failures, Playwright Test might use different number of worker processes to run all the tests. For example, Playwright Test will always start a new worker process after a failing test.

Worker-scoped fixtures receive a WorkerInfo parameter that describes the current worker configuration. See WorkerInfo properties for available worker information.

Consider an example where we run a new http server per worker process, and use workerIndex to produce a unique port number:

// my-test.ts
import { test as base } from '@playwright/test';
import * as http from 'http';

// Note how we mark the fixture as { scope: 'worker' }.
// Also note that we pass empty {} first, since we do not declare any test fixtures.
export const test = base.extend<{}, { server: http.Server }>({
server: [ async ({}, use, workerInfo) => {
// Start the server.
const server = http.createServer();
server.listen(9000 + workerInfo.workerIndex);
await new Promise(ready => server.once('listening', ready));

// Use the server in the tests.
await use(server);

// Cleanup.
await new Promise(done => server.close(done));
}, { scope: 'worker' } ]
});

Add custom matchers using expect.extend

Playwright Test uses expect library under the hood which has the functionality to extend it with custom matchers.

In this example we add a custom toBeWithinRange function in the configuration file.

// playwright.config.ts
import { expect, PlaywrightTestConfig } from '@playwright/test';

expect.extend({
toBeWithinRange(received: number, floor: number, ceiling: number) {
const pass = received >= floor && received <= ceiling;
if (pass) {
return {
message: () => 'passed',
pass: true,
};
} else {
return {
message: () => 'failed',
pass: false,
};
}
},
});

const config: PlaywrightTestConfig = {};
export default config;

Now we can use toBeWithinRange in the test.

// example.spec.ts
import { test, expect } from '@playwright/test';

test('numeric ranges', () => {
expect(100).toBeWithinRange(90, 110);
expect(101).not.toBeWithinRange(0, 100);
});

For TypeScript, also add the following to your global.d.ts. If it does not exist, you need to create it inside your repository. Make sure that your global.d.ts gets included inside your tsconfig.json via the include or compilerOptions.typeRoots option so that your IDE will pick it up.

You don't need it for JavaScript.

// global.d.ts
export {};

declare global {
namespace PlaywrightTest {
interface Matchers<R, T> {
toBeWithinRange(a: number, b: number): R;
}
}
}